Friday 09/10/2021 by phishnet

ARTS EDUCATION WEEK, SEPTEMBER 12 TO 18: THE AWESOME POWER OF ARTS EDUCATION

[This site is run entirely by volunteers as a project of The Mockingbird Foundation, a nonprofit dedicated to raising funds for educating children and young adults in musical arts. This post is courtesy of Neve Spicer, who promotes arts education. -Ed.]

Art, music, and film move us, inspire us, and help us to see the world in new ways. Studying the arts does more than just bring us closer to the media we love, it can also be a gateway to personal, psychological, and cognitive benefits -- this is especially true for kids.

Research has shown that participation in arts education during childhood is linked with positive impacts to self esteem, collaborative skill, physical development, and even math and literacy skills. It is valuable contributions like these which are the driving force behind National Arts in Education Week, an annual arts-ed advocacy campaign sponsored by Americans for the Arts.

Taking place from September 12th to 18th, the seven-day event encourages students, parents, teachers, artists, and all those passionate about arts education opportunities to participate in advocacy opportunities through social media and in communication with school boards and other important leadership. To sign a pledge in support of arts education and learn more about getting involved with online, local, and national advocacy efforts, visit the National Arts in Education Week website.

© 2021 Vlada Karpovich (used with permission)
© 2021 Vlada Karpovich (used with permission)

Some of the most remarkable benefits of arts education include:

  • The development of a broader and more nuanced worldview, brought on by learning about different cultures and lifestyles and by working collaboratively with peers (source)
  • The encouragement of healthy, age-appropriate risk taking in a safe environment, which helps children to feel confidence and overcome fears (source)
  • An overall improvement in cognition, including better decision making, improved visual/spatial reasoning, deeper concentration, and more detailed observation (source)
  • A reduction in anxiety, depression, and stress, and the promotion of relaxation, positivity, and psychological well-being (source)
  • Boosts in academic achievement, including math skills, literacy, language, and writing (source)
  • Higher rates of school attendance, a reduced chance of dropping out, and a greater likelihood of eventual enrollment in post-secondary school (source)
  • The development and use of empathy, tolerance, accountability, and conflict resolution skills when dealing with peers, including the ability to accept and acknowledge constructive criticism and self-regulate emotions (source)

To join the National Arts in Education Week social media campaign, share your story on your favorite platform with the hashtag #BecauseOfArtsEd.

If you liked this blog post, one way you could "like" it is to make a donation to The Mockingbird Foundation, the sponsor of Phish.net. Support music education for children, and you just might change the world.


Comments

, comment by tubescreamer
tubescreamer I taught elementary art for 7 years and can attest to the power of art education on young brains. We had phish Friday’s where I would throw on a jam and we’d get down. I put out an album of kid songs I had written for the kids at school and 100% of the profits went to the Seven Below Foundation. Art and music is essential for kids.
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